Stephen Evans

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Stephen is a playwright and author of The Marriage of True Minds and A Transcendental Journey. http://www.amazon.com/Transcendental-Journey-Stephen-Evans-ebook/dp/B00IHPLCB6

On Rolls the Old World

"The two parties which divide the state, the party of Conservatism and that of Innovation, are very old, and have disputed the possession of the world ever since it was made. This quarrel is the subject of civil history. The conservative party established the reverend hierarchies and monarchies of the most ancient world. The battle of patrician and plebeian, of parent state and colony, of old usage and accommodation to new facts, of the rich and the poor, reappears in all countries and times. The war rages not only in battle-fields, in national councils, and ecclesiastical synods, but agitates every man's bosom with opposing advantages every hour. On rolls the old world meantime, and now one, now the other gets the day, and still the fight renews itself as if for the first time, under new names and hot personalities."

Ralph Waldo Emerson

1841

 

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No One Expects Metasequoia Glyptostroboides

I like trees. This fact will not surprise you if you’ve read this or this.

I’m not exactly sure when this relationship began. But I think it might have been in 1970, on a family vacation to California. We flew out to San Francisco and drove down the coast to LA, stopping for a few days in Yosemite, where I took 1000 or so bad photos, which are now bad and unwatched slides. And somewhere around there we also saw Redwoods.

There were many of them, I think, but not a whole forest of them. And I'm not sure but I beieve we saw one that you could drive through. I don’t really remember how they looked, exactly, or what I thought. But I remember how they made me feel. I remember being surrounded by a sense of immense age, impressed with the realization that there were beings on this earth measured in frames outside the human.   

That was nearly fifty years ago, a long time for me, a moment for them. For some reason over the last few years, I have felt a strong desire to see them again. I’m not sure why, or why now. Maybe I hope something so ancient will make me feel young again. Or maybe just a worry that they, along with so much else, may soon disappear, from erosion or drought or acid rain or who knows. Things disappear – I have learned that. But they also appear.

There is a path behind my house where I walk once or twice most weeks, for the last decade or so. The crooked tree is there, so is the straight one, and most of the others I have written about. I was walking a few days ago when I saw this one.

It’s a redwood. Not a California Redwood, but a Dawn redwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides, an Asian cousin. It won’t grow as tall as Sequoia sempervirens or a large around as Sequoiadendron giganteum. But it is a redwood. A beautiful one. And it had been there, a hundred yards from my home, for years.

So keep an eye out for redwoods. My new motto is: No one expects Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

Recent Comments
Rosy Cole
You're on the button. No one does expect Metasequoia Glyptostroboides Even Dr Johnson would have been put out of countenance! A ... Read More
Wednesday, 26 April 2017 22:21
Stephen Evans
sounds like a lovely visit. red squirrels - don;t think I have ever seen that - makes sense though! we have black or grey here.... Read More
Thursday, 27 April 2017 18:53
Ken Hartke
Much to my surprise, I spotted a couple in our local nursery. It is a joy to touch the foliage. I just wonder how they would manag... Read More
Thursday, 27 April 2017 16:14
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Literary Limerick

One day Harold was writing a play

Which began in the usual way:

Someone came to a party,

and then it got arty

when no body wanted to stay.

Recent Comments
Rosy Cole
Pinter tends to have that effect on many folk :-)
Thursday, 20 April 2017 14:05
Stephen Evans
Including me!
Friday, 21 April 2017 01:17
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Whence and Whither

The whence of beauty always is unclear.

The whither, that we know, is far from here.

 

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Latest Comments

Stephen Evans Flipping the Omelet
18 January 2018
This is the whole of my philosophy. Via con huevos.
Rosy Cole Flipping the Omelet
18 January 2018
And does this in-depth advice also apply to pancakes? Will it preclude adherence to the overhead lig...
Stephen Evans Going to the Dickens
14 January 2018
Thank you! That sounds just my style
Katherine Gregor Going to the Dickens
14 January 2018
I haven't yet been able to read a Dickens novel in ful (shame on me).May I recommend a wonderful New...
Katherine Gregor Four Wishes
14 January 2018
Amen to this.

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