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    Stephen Evans
    Stephen Evans commented on the blog post, Flipping the Omelet

    This is the whole of my philosophy. Via con huevos.

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    Rosy Cole
    Rosy Cole commented on the blog post, Flipping the Omelet

    And does this in-depth advice also apply to pancakes? Will it preclude adherence to the overhead light fixture? There's less than four weeks left to practise! #needtoknow

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    Stephen Evans
    Stephen Evans created a new blog post, Flipping the Omelet

    Flipping the Omelet

    Posted in Blogs on Thursday, 18 January 2018

    Very few people who have eaten my cooking realize that I am an expert cook. My topic today is flipping the omelet. (Disclaimer: my omelets don't look like this) Never flip an omelet from the center. Always flip from the side. If you are right-handed, flip from the left side. If you are left-handed, flip from the right. Never flip from out to in. Flip in to out if you must. Never flip from back to front or front to back. It just confuses the omelet Not to mention the cook. These instructions apply to many areas of life, especially if butter is involved.   (From the archives)    

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    Stephen Evans
    Stephen Evans commented on the blog post, Going to the Dickens

    Thank you! That sounds just my style :)

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    Katherine Gregor
    Katherine Gregor commented on the blog post, Going to the Dickens

    I haven't yet been able to read a Dickens novel in ful (shame on me).

    May I recommend a wonderful New Year story? THE CHIMES. The first couple of pages alone is a joy. About the sounds a wind makes when trapped in a church...

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    Katherine Gregor
    Katherine Gregor commented on the blog post, Four Wishes

    Amen to this.

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    Stephen Evans
    Stephen Evans commented on the blog post, Four Wishes

    Devoutly to be wished.

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    Rosy Cole
    Rosy Cole created a new blog post, Four Wishes

    Four Wishes

    Posted in Blogs on Wednesday, 10 January 2018

      Image courtesy of Diane Romanello     ...For time to heal and feel and breathe free air unlaced with taint of death, to ponder skies of patent blue and kindled clouds of sunset hue, to savour moments where life lives and know no situation gives of itself and without cost, for in pursuit true life is lost ...and space beyond encroaching walls, a banished need for shopping malls, those boundaries of every kind breached on land, in heart and mind, and false divisions that enlist a pledge that puts us to the test, removes our footprints with the tide of cross-hatched plots and national pride  ...and place where energies recharge, a refuge from the world at large so inspiration finds its wings, hard-earned spoils each season brings, where travel can reveal new cultures but foils the money-changing vultures, lends atmospheres that tell of history and conjures legends wreathed in mystery ...and Grace in time and space to find a place within our heart and mind of peace, emblem of that heavenly home where pearls exchange for purchased loam, furnished by One who pierced the gloom and snapped the bondage of the tomb and rose to greet a golden dawn, a mystic presence in our form   from Mysteries of Light (collection in preparation)  

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    Stephen Evans
    Stephen Evans commented on the blog post, Going to the Dickens

    Thank you! Ken has reminded me that I read A Tale of Two Cities in school. I am moving on to Carson McCullers :)

    However, I am adding Bleak House to my list of unreadable books that I must try, right after The Magic Mountain.

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    Rosy Cole
    Rosy Cole commented on the blog post, Going to the Dickens

    Are you sure you want to read Dickens? You can't skip all the narrative with him! He's much dramatised, but hardly the postage stamp playwright's choice :-)

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    Ken Hartke
    Ken Hartke commented on the blog post, Going to the Dickens

    Happy reading -- there's a lot to choose from. I had to read Great Expectations and Tale of Two Cities in school and still remember most of both books. Both were written later in his career. Oliver Twist is an early book. I tried to read Bleak House but gave it up. So many have been made into movies or mini-series that you probably have seen. He wrote a bunch of short stories, like Christmas Carol, that are less known. American Notes is a travelogue of his trip to the USA in the 1840s. Most, maybe all, of his major writing is online. Check Project Gutenberg.

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    Stephen Evans
    Stephen Evans created a new blog post, Going to the Dickens

    Going to the Dickens

    Posted in Blogs on Friday, 05 January 2018

    I have never read anything by Charles Dickens. The closest I ever came was playing Young Scrooge in a production of The Christmas Carol (many years ago - Dickens was probably still living).  I have decided this is the year to correct this oversight, and I am looking for recommendations. Anyone have any favorites?  Other than Christmas Carol.      

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    Katherine Gregor

    Hear, hear, Rosy. 'tis now the time to act.

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    Rosy Cole
    Rosy Cole commented on the blog post, A New Focus for the New Year?

    Thank you, Katia, and much reciprocation :-)

    Couldn't agree more with your sentiments. As someone we both know (not a member of this site) said to me a couple of years back 'keep putting your good out there'. Focus on that. I mean to, and to support those who strive to do the same. This is what 'one step at a time' boils down to and, perhaps contrarily, is where the real power is, always has been, always will be.

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    Katherine Gregor

    They do say in Qigong and Tai Chi that by pushing against your opponent you only lose strength and make him/her push harder against you... (Not sure I've phrased this correctly but that's the idea). Happy New Year and very best wishes to you, Stephen.

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    Stephen Evans

    Worth a try! Happy new year to you!

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    Katherine Gregor

    A New Focus for the New Year?

    Posted in Blogs on Sunday, 31 December 2017

    I am just wondering if a shift of focus might help. Practice makes perfect, so the more you repeat an action or even a thought, the more likely is that action or thought to become consolidated.  After all, wherever we direct our attention, there our physical and mental resources flow.  Everybody knows that. Or do we? It occurs to me that we spend a lot of our time and energy fighting against things we don't want.  Perhaps more than necessary.  Perhaps more than building, nurturing, creating the things we want. So much of our focus and energy goes on being anti what we hate or dread that I question how much energy we have left on focusing on being pro what we actually want.  Do we have sufficient time and energy to focus on both with equal effectiveness? It's a question that has been buzzing in my head for some time now.  Speaking for myself, I certainly do not. Perhaps I'm mistaken, but I get the impression there are more marches and demonstrations against unwanted situations and wrongdoings than in favour of desired or just ones.  Of course, when something blatantly wrong happens, I feel that peacefully voicing your disagreement or sense of outrage is the right thing to do.  But once this opinion is expressed, shouldn't the next step be to focus all our strength on building what we actually want? When I was a small child, my mother had a UNICEF desk calendar with a quotation for every month.  One stuck in my mind, even though at the time I couldn't understand what it meant.  "Problems, like babies, grow bigger with nursing." I cannot remember who said it and only several decades later do I understand more fully the meaning and wisdom of this sentence. It seems Mother Teresa once said, "I will never attend an anti-war rally; if you have a peace rally, invite me."  Nobody could possibly doubt Mother Teresa's commitment to world peace.  I can only suppose that the reason she refused to attend anti-war rallies was because she disagreed with the focus – however kindly and justly intended – of these rallies. The focus of any anti-something act is one of opposition.  Like pushing against something.  Could it just be possible – and that's just an idea – that by pushing hard against it we unintentionally end up supporting it? Feeding it? Strengthening it by giving it so much of our attention that we somehow consolidate it even further? Surely, for focus to be unwavering, then we need to choose very carefully – no, we cannot be both in equal strength – whether we want to fight what we don't want or build what we want.  As a year of much darkness, ignorance, stupidity and senseless waste draws to a close, I am hoping for a 2018 with the following: Replacing anti-Brexit stands with pro-Europe commitment. Replacing every retweet of a bully or genuinely incompetent politician with a tweet about a wise, kind or simply happily comical individual.  Plants that aren't watered wither.  Let's stop fuelling destructive individuals with too much attention.  Instead, let's lavish our attention on those we want to play more prominent roles in our society. TV and Radio stations where 50% of news headlines broadcast good, encouraging items.  Yes, there are some, if news editors are willing to look. Rather than anti-sexual harassment protests, pro-respect and gender equality rallies. This list could go on and on and on... One step at a time, we can shift our focus, and, consequently, change things for the better. Together, we can do it. So let's. I wish you all a very happy, healthy, wealthy, fulfilling New Year. Scribe Doll

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    Sue Martin Glasco

    Thank you, dear writer friends! I probably will not be able to resist blogging occasionally, and I know I will read others' posts when time allows. Our daughter Katherine has been in the hospital since Dec. 18, but may be admitted at least for awhile to skilled nursing home tomorrow. We have had 17 of our 26 immediate family here at least in and out part of the time this holiday season. Our local daughter had a beautiful feast for all who could come on Christmas Day. Last night all four bedrooms here were full and three people had to sleep on couches. Younger cousins (now all very young adults) are having a gift exchange and get together tonight. Erin and baby Caroline fly back to Texas tomorrow morn and Geri Ann flies back to Oregon. Nine left this morning, but three of those will be going back through here later in the week. I wanted a big family, and at this point in life, I have achieved it. My 92 year old sister and her husband had 25 for Christmas Eve at their house. Sadly two of their four adopted daughters died a few years ago. They partially raised a grandson, and he usually showed up for supper with them the last few years--both my sister and husband are excellent cooks--and now this grandson moved into their house next door after renter moved out. So I do nor have to worry about them. Their middle daughter and husband are also only a couple blocks or so away, Their family is even more complicated than ours, and so is my brother's family. Lots of heart aches and problems in big families but also lots of joys. Small families have advantages and are often closer than large ones, and I know many valuable creative contributing singles too! I am convinced as we worry about our democracy right now that all eras, just as all families, have problems but often valuable solutions. I hope 2018 is not a worse war problem for us, but so many of the world's people are in the throes of war right now. I am still trying to figure out how to balance living happily while others suffer fires, hurricanes, and war. Talk to you later!!

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    Stephen Evans

    I agree with Ken and Rosy - I certainly understand the desire to focus on other work, but do hope you'll be able to stop by Green Room once in a while. All best!

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    Ken Hartke

    I truly enjoy reading your posts. I remember many of the places you write about from my youth. I spent a little time there and have relations in Ste. Gen and Millstadt and went to college in Cape. Many of my college friends came from Little Egypt. As the family historian, I know how much work that can be and how frustrating at times. I hope you get a chance to update us how things are going. I've never experienced a large family so it has always been interesting reading.

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Latest Comments

Stephen Evans Flipping the Omelet
18 January 2018
This is the whole of my philosophy. Via con huevos.
Rosy Cole Flipping the Omelet
18 January 2018
And does this in-depth advice also apply to pancakes? Will it preclude adherence to the overhead lig...
Stephen Evans Going to the Dickens
14 January 2018
Thank you! That sounds just my style
Katherine Gregor Going to the Dickens
14 January 2018
I haven't yet been able to read a Dickens novel in ful (shame on me).May I recommend a wonderful New...
Katherine Gregor Four Wishes
14 January 2018
Amen to this.

Latest Blogs

Very few people who have eaten my cooking realize that I am an expert cook. My topic today is flipping the omelet. (Disclaimer: my omelets don't lo...
  Image courtesy of Diane Romanello     ...For time to heal and feel and breathe free air unlaced with taint of death, to ponder...
I have never read anything by Charles Dickens. The closest I ever came was playing Young Scrooge in a production of The Christmas Carol (many years ag...
I am just wondering if a shift of focus might help. Practice makes perfect, so the more you repeat an action or even a thought, the more likely is th...
Woodsong Christmas 2017 Dear Friends and Relatives, Perhaps our greatest blessing in 2017 was Erin's giving birth to our first great granddaughter—...