A ROSH HASHANAH POST

This was posted on September 24 before candle lighting.

 

Todays surprise is a rose. The last rose of summer. The last rose of the Jewish calendar year. It somehow seems appropriate. It was new this morning, but shows some tears in the petals, and a bit of bruising. Yet still, there is a beauty - and the rose is pushing through - showing life and determination to bloom.

“'Tis the last rose of summer left blooming alone
All her lovely companions are faded and gone.”

...

As the desert welcomes the cool air. And Rosh Hashanah brings the new year. Forgetting and letting go of wrong doings of the last year. Making amends for sins intentional and unintentional… and trusting for a better year… a sweet year.

This is particularly significant for me. My father named me Sharon - because of the Rose of Sharon. The rose has always been my favorite flower, since I was a tiny child.

To see this small token of the Creator in the month that is the birthday of the world - this morning is miraculous. The roses stopped blooming over a month ago. But this morning. . .one lovely reminder that life goes on. That this year is over. That the new year can be better...sweeter.
"L'shana tovah tikatev v'etahetem,"

And so it begins..

Comments 2

 
Rosy Cole on Sunday, 28 September 2014 17:57

Lovely post and great to see you!

The Irish poet, Thomas Moore, who wrote that song, figures in two of my historical novels.

Last year, I had a lemon rose bloom all season and into the depths of winter, right up until March. Then it rested, only to awaken to an unusually fine summer, whereupon it bloomed its heart out some more. Now it feels the pull of the earth and has given up the ghost to its companions. But halfway to the spring equinox, the sap with begin to rise and the rose will stir and gleam into leaf and bloom sweetly again... This year, counterpoint. Next year, maybe, a chorus...

I hope it's a sweet year for you, Sharon, and that some corners are turned. Shana Tovah!

Lovely post and great to see you! The Irish poet, Thomas Moore, who wrote that song, figures in two of my historical novels. Last year, I had a lemon rose bloom all season and into the depths of winter, right up until March. Then it rested, only to awaken to an unusually fine summer, whereupon it bloomed its heart out some more. Now it feels the pull of the earth and has given up the ghost to its companions. But halfway to the spring equinox, the sap with begin to rise and the rose will stir and gleam into leaf and bloom sweetly again... This year, counterpoint. Next year, maybe, a chorus... I hope it's a sweet year for you, Sharon, and that some corners are turned. Shana Tovah!
Sharon Darlene Walling on Saturday, 03 October 2015 17:50

Rosy - I can't believe I have just seen this today. a year later. I haven't been writing regularly...or posting anything regularly. So good to see you too!

Rosy - I can't believe I have just seen this today. a year later. I haven't been writing regularly...or posting anything regularly. So good to see you too!
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