The Best Thing for Being Sad

“The best thing for being sad," replied Merlin, beginning to puff and blow, "is to learn something. That's the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then — to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the only thing for you. Look what a lot of things there are to learn.”


― T.H. White, The Once and Future King

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Big Data Analytics

I spent time at work this morning reading big data analytic results. I should add that it’s time like these, when I’m being paid to read and think and nobody is bothering me, that I enjoy my job.

 

Some of the results I read were surprising, challenging assumptions. Ex-convicts make very good call center employees. Where you went to college is not a great indicator for business and professional success. Going to college and finishing are much better indicators.

I don’t know the words for all the things I read and discovered today. Knowledge can become very specialized very quickly. For example, I told my wife about the ex-convict results. Yes, she replied, but can they be trusted with credit card and personal information?

Her response is probably a modern response and I believe it’s typical. I think it’s some sort of transference. American society generally doesn’t trust ex-convicts. They broke a law and were caught and sentenced, therefore, we’ve proven they can’t be trusted. We have also demonstrated that some percentage of convictions is wrongful, numbers that vary by crime and geography, numbers influenced by race and sex. And more people in America are being sentenced for victimless crimes, such as possession of marijuana and other drugs purchased for personal use. We also have evidence that the monetization of penal institutions influences conviction and incarceration rates. Judges and DAs have been caught taking kickbacks from the institutions where they’re sending the convicted.

That highlights the differences between what data analyses can demonstrate against what people believe. I constantly encounter it on my job and weary of explaining the numbers and trends and again. We are people, though. Besides being capable of logic, we’re emotional. Once emotions color our perceptions, it seems difficult for us to drain those colors out.

The problem with acquiring knowledge is that it stimulates my thinking. That’s a lazy way of stating it. Acquiring knowledge and thinking more aren’t issues. Neither is being stimulated to think more. The problem, perhaps, is that I’m frequently perceived as a thinker but that many of my ideas and insights are difficult to follow. I know, it’s my issue, a matter of how I take that information and what I do with it – but I am a thinker, you see – but I’m also insecure, thin-skinned and emotional.

Anyway, I wondered after reading these big data results. I’d recently read that JPMorgan has decided it will only accept applications for analysts positions from Ivy League schools. That reduces their application pool and the subsequent work load to hire new employees, yet I wonder how this flies in the face of the big data results and whether JPMorgan is setting itself up for paradigm failure. I wonder if they’re yielding short term gains for long term losses, saving money by reducing their pool and hiring people fast, but losing money later because better analysts actually go to schools beside Ivy League institutions.

I wonder about how small businesses can be served by big data analytics. I saw numerous ways in which they can, from location and the name to wall paint color and décor decisions to hours, the music being played, and the services and goods being offered. Big data takes money. It’s not an easy process. But I think small businesses could benefit, especially in a place like my small town, where businesses come and go like migratory birds. My answer would be for the small businesses to form a consortium with the goal of having a big data analytics conducted on the businesses and the local economic/environmental influencers.  They could then share the costs. I imagine that as an economic project, loans and grants from the different governments could be found to support such a project.

Of course, I write novels and mull the frustrations of finding publication, creating a brand, marketing myself and my products and earning a living from the pleasure of writing. I mull what big data analytics would show about fiction publishing, especially in this age of self-publishing and digital publishing. One issue constantly encountered is that agents, editors and publishers seek what they enjoy but also try to follow market trends. I’d love to see big data analytics take on the subject.

Writing science fiction, it’s pleasurable toying with big data analytics and human events, like falling in love, committing crimes, finding work, illnesses and death. Isaac Asimov, one of my favorite classic hard science fiction authors, did a terrific job of using big data and analytics in his Foundation series. His scientists predicted a mutant outlier that would cause problems….

 (Aside – I sometimes wonder if my company actually employs big data analytics as much as it could, for surely that would tailor all their sales and marketing efforts and their new product requirements instead of demanding we present business cases and marketing plans to support launching new products and services….)

Big data analytics can’t quite predict everything, then, but the delta between what can be analyzed and what evades analysis is shrinking. I consider myself an artist. I imagined, drew, and painted long before I began writing. I designed cars and interiors and exteriors, and painted and drew in multiple mediums, turning down some small art scholarships to attend college to go do other things. I didn’t know ‘what I wanted to be’ and lacked the insight to realize that learning more would help me understand myself and my desires. I thought, perhaps because that’s how the instruction was geared in the schools I intended, that the goal to schooling was to graduate and find a job and earn a living. Scoffing at that, I joined the military. Problem solved, right? I had a job and I was earning a living.

Eventually I discovered I wanted to try writing fiction to express myself, and here I sit. As an artist, I think some fragment of being human will always evade analysis, a conclusion I share with many thought leaders in AI, robotics and automation. The one thing that can’t be predicted or duplicated remains the human imagination, for now. Some bold new paradigm may be emerging on the horizon, though, that will change that as well.

So, maybe someday some artificial intelligence will sit down to write like crazy and create fiction.

 

I’ll keep trying, though, for at least one more day.

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The Customer Is Always Right Or "Meaningful Learning"

At a time when our Education Minister, Rabbi Shay Piron is trying to bring about change in the schools with his concept of “meaningful learning,” I have to wonder how he reconciles this lofty idea with the last incident concerning  the  suspension of the Israeli teacher  in Ashkelon.

That teacher  was suspended by her principal  after a  student had hacked into her private email, and published  in the class’ Wattsup his findings-- intimate photos of that teacher in the nude.

Please keep on reading in The Times Of Israel

http://blogs.timesofisrael.com/the-customer-is-always-right-or-meaningful-learning/

 

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