A Day Bearing a Unique Gift

I look at the clock.  It's 5:50 a.m.  Beyond the windows it's still night and yet I'm wide awake, with a sense of renewed hope and purpose.  Then I remember: the clocks have gone back an hour.  It's the start of that special day that comes bearing a gift not even Father Christmas can bring – the precious grace of an extra hour.

I'm always excited on this day.  It gives you another chance to make a clean start, the possibility to put into practice new ideas that are better than the ones you've just swept out of your life along with cobwebs, possessions you'd been hoarding just in case, and people whose friendship had wilted beyond any nurturing.  A whole extra hour to do something you didn't have the time to do yesterday, perhaps, or something you've longed to do for ages, or else something spontaneous and unexpected.  A potentially magical sixty minutes pregnant with all sorts of wonderful opportunities and possibilities.  So I'd better get out of bed now and not waste this charmed hour.

I sip a cup of warm water, then treat myself to half an hour of gentle yet invigorating Qi Gong practice.

wp_20161030_002The night sky is growing pale when H. and I go out for a walk.  A cushion of fog softens the contours of the River Wensum, the trees and the buildings, and throws a dream-like veil over the fiery autumn red, ocher and gold.  There are very few people about and those we encounter smile and say good morning in subdued voices, as though we humans are all aware of being out-of-hours trespassers in what is left of a night that belongs to hooting owls, amber-eyed foxes, and witches making last-minute preparations for Hallowe'en tomorrow.

A seagull calls out uncharacteristically shyly above our heads as it swoops slowly across the milky sky.  Somewhere deep in the thick, yellowing mane of a weeping willow, there's the rattle of a magpie.  A squirrel runs across the path and scurries up a horse chestnut tree, then pauses to observe us from the top.

"Look!" H. says and points at a bush on the riverbank.

We approach slowly.  A cormorant is sitting heavily on a slim branch, causing it to sway, as though trying to hide from the solitary, ethereal swan that's gliding on the far side of the water.

wp_20161030_003

By the flint building of Pulls Ferry, a red-breasted robin is hopping on the wooden gate post, eyeing us with curiosity.

He's not the only one.  I can feel hundreds of eyes watching us benevolently as we walk, while golden leaves drop down from the trees and float towards us in swing-like motion.

As we reach the Close, the fog starts to dissipate, slowly unveiling the Cathedral spire that now looks like an Impressionist painting.  The sound of the bell drifts through the air, announcing Morning Prayer and the start of this human day which, today, carries the magic of more time.

wp_20161030_005-copy

Scribe Doll

Comments 4

 
Rosy Cole on Monday, 31 October 2016 15:27

A beautiful piece, the prose itself like a painting and the images so atmospheric. As far as I know, Norwich Cathedral wasn't one J M W Turner got round to, but John Sell Cotman did some fine watercolours of the interior. Grace, yes! See what it can do! Thanks for sharing, Katia.

A beautiful piece, the prose itself like a painting and the images so atmospheric. As far as I know, Norwich Cathedral wasn't one J M W Turner got round to, but John Sell Cotman did some fine watercolours of the interior. Grace, yes! See what it can do! Thanks for sharing, Katia.
Katherine Gregor on Wednesday, 02 November 2016 07:20

Thank you, Rosy. I'll look up John Sell Cotman's watercolours. Grace, indeed! ;–)

Thank you, Rosy. I'll look up John Sell Cotman's watercolours. Grace, indeed! ;–)
Stephen Evans on Wednesday, 02 November 2016 00:18

Beautiful!

Beautiful!
Katherine Gregor on Wednesday, 02 November 2016 07:20

Thank you!

Thank you!
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Monday, 10 August 2020

Captcha Image

Writing For Life

We are a small, friendly community who value writing as a tool for developing a brighter understanding of the world and humanity. We share our passions and experiences with one another and with a public readership. ‘Guest’ comments are welcome. No login is required. In Social Media we are happy to include interesting articles by other writers on any of the themes below. Enjoy!


Latest Blogs

A friend recently reminded me of the power in kindness when she asked, what makes an urban area kind? My first thought was, how can an object or mass...
The other evening, my wife and I went for a stroll along the Thames Path  not far from London's Chelsea Harbour and stopped to sit awhile in a  deligh...
“I was inspired by the marvelous example of Giacometti, the great sculptor. He always said that his dream was to do a bust so small that it could ente...
Over the years, I’ve written about some of life’s certainties — birth, death, time and change. You can guarantee we will all experience those things. ...

Latest Comments

Nicholas Mackey A life in trees
08 August 2020
Thank you, Rosy for reading and commenting.
Stephen Evans The Lessons of Gurnemanz
06 August 2020
Interesting -thank you! have to see if I can find those books. The Osiris story is in my Emerson p...
Rosy Cole The Lessons of Gurnemanz
06 August 2020
I read this today in Eliot's notes on The Wasteland:Not only the title, but the plan and a good deal...
Monika Schott PhD Expectations
03 August 2020
Rosy, I'm so touched by your beautiful description of my writing, it's never been described in that ...
Rosy Cole A life in trees
02 August 2020
Trees have such awesome vigour and staying power. There's a silver birch, fifty or sixty feet high, ...