Every Leaf In Springtime

It’s been the darkest winter I can remember, skies uniformly leaden, the earth deluged, the nation divided, and the world angst-ridden in the throes of a deadly virus that looks set to change our way of being for ever.

But the truth is, the future was never ours. We hope, we make plans, we strive and steer towards our goals, though, often, life imposes other designs and death may come as a thief in the night.

There is no future except what opens up from the present moments and how we approach the challenges and appreciate the blessings they afford. It’s about our best endeavours in plying with what is. Oughts and shoulds belong to the past.

Earning and deserving don’t enter the picture. Rain falls and sun shines on just and unjust alike. The life of the planet and the wellbeing of everything on it awaits our generous response. We can't do it alone. We need each other. And we need the mercy and grace of the Creator.

If death and destruction can steal a march on us, so can good fortune, just like the breathtaking revelation of spring...





“Our Lord has written the promise of resurrection, not in books alone, but in every leaf in springtime.” 

Martin Luther





“Spring is the time of plans and projects.”

Leo Tolstoy




“It is spring again. The earth is like a child that knows poems by heart.”

Rainer Maria Rilke





“Nostalgia in reverse, the longing for yet another strange land, grew especially strong in spring.”

Vladimir Nabokov




“I enjoy the spring more than the autumn now. One does, I think, as one gets older.”

Virginia Woolf




“The deep roots never doubt spring will come.”

 Marty Rubin





“It was such a spring day as breathes into a man an ineffable yearning, a painful sweetness, a longing that makes him stand motionless, looking at the leaves or grass, and fling out his arms to embrace he knows not what.”

John Galsworthy




“Spring drew on...and a greenness grew over those brown beds, which, freshening daily,
suggested the thought that Hope traversed them at night, and left each morning brighter traces of her steps.”


Charlotte Brontë




“A Robin said: The Spring will never come,
And I shall never care to build again.
A Rosebush said: These frosts are wearisome,
My sap will never stir for sun or rain.
The half Moon said: These nights are fogged and slow,
I neither care to wax nor care to wane.
The Ocean said: I thirst from long ago,
Because earth's rivers cannot fill the main. —
When Springtime came, red Robin built a nest,
And trilled a lover's song in sheer delight.
Grey hoarfrost vanished, and the Rose with might
Clothed her in leaves and buds of crimson core.
The dim Moon brightened. Ocean sunned his crest,
Dimpled his blue, yet thirsted evermore.”

Christina Rossetti





"Nature is bent on new beginning
and death has not a chance of winning..."

Rosy Cole





Comments 4

 
Ken Hartke on Friday, 17 April 2020 06:04

Thank you for a hopeful view of days ahead. I always think of spring being downhill from winter. You can see it in the distance and it seems easy to get tnere. But this year it seems more distant and clouded over. My lilacs are very cheerful right now but other blooms are delayed for a few weeks. We still have cold nights a few times a week and some snow a few days ago. But that is the end of winter, they tell us. Our botanical garden is blooming with spring bulbs and tree blossoms but it is locked up tight thanks to the virus. I hope the bees and butterflies are enjoying them. I was in UK and Ireland last month and every park and garden had something blooming in spite of the clouds and rain (and the pandemic). It was very uplifting.
“This is what l love about flowers. Wherever possible, they just grow; in between the weeds, through a crack in a stone, in the middle of mud or moss - they just grow fearlessly, so confident of their short-lived beauty.” ― Asma Naqi

Thank you for a hopeful view of days ahead. I always think of spring being downhill from winter. You can see it in the distance and it seems easy to get tnere. But this year it seems more distant and clouded over. My lilacs are very cheerful right now but other blooms are delayed for a few weeks. We still have cold nights a few times a week and some snow a few days ago. But that is the end of winter, they tell us. Our botanical garden is blooming with spring bulbs and tree blossoms but it is locked up tight thanks to the virus. I hope the bees and butterflies are enjoying them. I was in UK and Ireland last month and every park and garden had something blooming in spite of the clouds and rain (and the pandemic). It was very uplifting. “This is what l love about flowers. Wherever possible, they just grow; in between the weeds, through a crack in a stone, in the middle of mud or moss - they just grow fearlessly, so confident of their short-lived beauty.” ― Asma Naqi
Rosy Cole on Friday, 17 April 2020 17:10

As I see it, Ken, there's no point in not having a hopeful view. Disastrous situations will happen, but turning them on their head is the stuff of Life. I'm not saying grief and pain can be avoided, or that we don't need help and support. But casting our net on the right side guarantees a positive outcome, though it may differ from what we envisaged. There's a transforming power in it.

I'm so glad you had a good time in Britain, despite all the restrictions beginning to kick in. My demographic has thirteen weeks of lockdown, but it's turning out that so does everyone who's not in basic key services and operations. The rules are necessarily draconian and certainly won't be lifted in a hurry.

Love the quote about flowers. It sums it all up. I went into the garden last weekend intending to photograph just the pear blossom on the garage wall, so it was a delightful surprise to see how, almost overnight, so many other things were coming into bloom. It really did reflect Easter joy. Things are about one month ahead this year in the South of England. I've lived in the area twenty-one years and have never known it happen before.

Thanks for your kind comments and all the interesting posts!

As I see it, Ken, there's no point in not having a hopeful view. Disastrous situations will happen, but turning them on their head is the stuff of Life. I'm not saying grief and pain can be avoided, or that we don't need help and support. But casting our net on the right side guarantees a positive outcome, though it may differ from what we envisaged. There's a transforming power in it. I'm so glad you had a good time in Britain, despite all the restrictions beginning to kick in. My demographic has thirteen weeks of lockdown, but it's turning out that so does everyone who's not in basic key services and operations. The rules are necessarily draconian and certainly won't be lifted in a hurry. Love the quote about flowers. It sums it all up. I went into the garden last weekend intending to photograph just the pear blossom on the garage wall, so it was a delightful surprise to see how, almost overnight, so many other things were coming into bloom. It really did reflect Easter joy. Things are about one month ahead this year in the South of England. I've lived in the area twenty-one years and have never known it happen before. Thanks for your kind comments and all the interesting posts!
Ken Hartke on Saturday, 18 April 2020 05:34

We were in London on March 2 before the restrictions were much in place. I was very surprised by the flowers that early.

We were in London on March 2 before the restrictions were much in place. I was very surprised by the flowers that early.
Nicholas Mackey on Thursday, 23 April 2020 18:41

Thank you for your uplifting article with lovely pictures suggesting that spring is here - a wonderful balm for these troubled times, Rosie.

Thank you for your uplifting article with lovely pictures suggesting that spring is here - a wonderful balm for these troubled times, Rosie.
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