Needling

For some, it's a massage or a facial. For me, it's acupuncture. As soon as I'm overwhelmed by stress, run down or simply in need of TLC (not to mention if ever I have a health concern), I book in for some needling.  Many an issue has been resolved with a few well-placed needles.

 

My favourite thing about acupuncture is that it thinks outside the box and joins unthinkably distant dots.  When one part of your body sounds an alarm bell or even just starts whimpering, the acupuncturist will consult all your other organs and functions – like a kind of body world summit – to find out who's really responsible. 

 

A few years ago, a strange-looking discoloured patch appeared on my body.  I went to the doctor.  She poked me, squeezed me and kneaded me.  "It's probably nothing," she declared sapiently.  "It'll probably go away."

 

I don't care for the word probably where my health is concerned.  The discoloured patch grew in size.  I went to see an acupuncturist.  She said the patch was located along my liver meridian (who said the body doesn't give you signs?).  She examined my tongue.  Liver issues.  Let's treat your liver and see.  

 

The discolouration disappeared within a couple of weeks.

 

It never ceases to fascinate me how my tongue seems to be the spokesperson for the rest of my body, how a Traditional Chinese Medicine-trained practitioner is able to diagnose a condition by studying a person's tongue.  I have vague memories of Western doctors telling me to "say 'Aaah'" when I was a small child.  Did they also use the same method of overview? Is it another skill the West has lost?

 

Chinese diagnosis, of course, uses a way of thinking that can feel very alien to a Western mind, at least at first.  It's just a matter of switching your brain to a different narrative.  You might be told that you have yin or yang deficiency, excessive damp, too much fire, for example.  As I gradually learn to get my head around these concepts, I find that they are extremely accurate as far as I am concerned.  And extremely wise.  Moreover, they convey a panoramic view of health and the body that allows one to see how everything is actually connected.  A method which Western medicine, in its increasingly localised specialisation, would certainly benefit from, in my opinion.

 

I first discovered acupuncture about twenty years ago.  I lifted something heavy awkwardly and my back froze, in excruciating pain.  I couldn't move.  The doctor was called (it was back in the golden days when it was easy to get a GP to visit you at home).  "It's a slipped disc," she said, prescribing pain killers – to be taken at four-hour intervals – and telling me to rest my back.

 

Within fifteen minutes of swallowing the tablets, the pain would plummet at supersonic speed, only to soar back up like a rocket during the fifteen minutes that followed, which left me in pain for the ensuing three and a half hours while I waited to be allowed another dose.  My life degenerated into a yo-yo of pain, mood swings, tears and depression.  "My life is going down the toilet!" I sobbed, a week later, when a friend rang to ask if I was better.  

    

She recommended a Traditional Chinese doctor.  The thought of needles pushed into my skin horrified me, but I was ready to try anything to get my life back.  I somehow made it to the front door and into a taxi.  I cried out at every speed bump.  By the time I reached the doctor, I was a wreck of tears, curses and despair.  The pain wouldn't even allow me to sit down.  The Chinese doctor examined me.  "It's not a slipped disc, it's a muscular spasm," she said.  

 

This was my introduction to the unsuspected connection acupuncture makes between seemingly unrelated dots.  It wasn't into my back the doctor put the needles, as I had expected – it was between my eyebrows.  "Sit down," she said calmly.

"I can't – it hurts... Oh? How did this happen?" 

I moved my hips gingerly, sat down, wriggled some more.  

 

No more pain.  No pain!

 

A few minutes later, I took the rush-hour, crowded bus home, stopped on the way to buy food from the supermarket and cooked my first proper meal in a week.

I look forward to my regular acupuncture sessions.  The practitioner examines my tongue, takes my pulses (yes, in Traditional Chinese Medicine this is a plural) and listens to my concerns or needs.  I lie down.  I generally don't feel any pain when the needles are pushed in.  Sometimes, I can't even feel them.  And then, more often than not, something wonderful and extraordinary happens to me.  I feel as though whirlwinds start to form around the points where the needles are inserted, and spread throughout my body like a warm, invigorating wave.  On occasions, I'll feel a pain or a twinge which will travel across my body, as though flying through a channel, then it disappears.  It feels as though my body becomes a hub of conversations, questions and answers and negotiations.  More often than not, I fall into a deep sleep.  I wake up feeling reborn.  Feeling taller.   Feeling truly, truly wonderful. 

 

I guess there's something to be said for a form of medicine that has been practised and perfected for a couple of thousand years longer than our Western medicine. Old is not always passé.

Scribe Doll

 

With huge thanks to, among others, Rebecca Geanty (https://www.treatnorwich.co.uk)

 

15 November is World Acupuncture Day

 

Comments 10

 
Stephen Evans on Friday, 16 November 2018 23:27

Fascinating! I will have to look into this. I have heard there are lots of studies that show the efficacy of acupuncture.

Fascinating! I will have to look into this. I have heard there are lots of studies that show the efficacy of acupuncture.
Katherine Gregor on Monday, 19 November 2018 10:28

Make sure you choose a fully accredited practitioner.

Make sure you choose a fully accredited practitioner.
Nicholas Mackey on Saturday, 17 November 2018 00:16

I've heard so much about this subject and now your article has pricked my interest (pun unintended) so I'm going to learn more about acupuncture.

I've heard so much about this subject and now your article has pricked my interest (pun unintended) so I'm going to learn more about acupuncture.
Katherine Gregor on Monday, 19 November 2018 10:29

I can highly recommend it – but make sure you go to a fully accredited acupuncturist.

I can highly recommend it – but make sure you go to a fully accredited acupuncturist.
Monika Schott on Sunday, 18 November 2018 10:33

I'm a devotee - love acupuncture!

I'm a devotee - love acupuncture!
Katherine Gregor on Monday, 19 November 2018 10:29

Yay!

Rosy Cole on Friday, 23 November 2018 15:05

If only it were possible that orthodox medicine would work together with long-established and accredited disciplines offering therapies! But I realise there are a myriad reasons why that is unlikely, not least because drug companies control our lives (and our minds and assumptions) way beyond their remit. We are much more than anatomy. Even using the term 'psychosomatic' doesn't begin to cut it. Reducing an understanding of the body to what is presently held to be 'scientific', cannot begin to factor in all the imponderables relating to a single patient who exists in an evolving universe.

I'm glad you found healing, Katia.

If only it were possible that orthodox medicine would work together with long-established and accredited disciplines offering therapies! But I realise there are a myriad reasons why that is unlikely, not least because drug companies control our lives (and our minds and assumptions) way beyond their remit. We are much more than anatomy. Even using the term 'psychosomatic' doesn't begin to cut it. Reducing an understanding of the body to what is presently held to be 'scientific', cannot begin to factor in all the imponderables relating to a single patient who exists in an evolving universe. I'm glad you found healing, Katia.
Katherine Gregor on Saturday, 24 November 2018 17:08

I've stopped using the term "orthodox medicine". Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine are also "orthodox" but in a different narrative. Now I say "conventional Western medicine". I am increasingly disillusioned with the Western way of delegating the responsability for our physical wellbeing to outside experts, and treating them like our bosses. A physician/practitioner/doctor is surely our ally – not our commander. I think the surgery aspect of conventional Western medicine is a miracle of art and invention. But I believe it has much to learn about the individual causes of chronic illness. As you say, we're hostages to the pharmaceutical industry. Like you, I dream of a world where convenional, modern and ancient ways of healing join forces and learn from one another. I also dream of a world where we are taught to listen to our bodies and take responsibility for our health.
Thank you so much for your thought-provoking comment, Rosy,

I've stopped using the term "orthodox medicine". Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine are also "orthodox" but in a different narrative. Now I say "conventional Western medicine". I am increasingly disillusioned with the Western way of delegating the responsability for our physical wellbeing to outside experts, and treating them like our bosses. A physician/practitioner/doctor is surely our ally – not our commander. I think the surgery aspect of conventional Western medicine is a miracle of art and invention. But I believe it has much to learn about the individual causes of chronic illness. As you say, we're hostages to the pharmaceutical industry. Like you, I dream of a world where convenional, modern and ancient ways of healing join forces and learn from one another. I also dream of a world where we are taught to listen to our bodies and take responsibility for our health. Thank you so much for your thought-provoking comment, Rosy,
Rosy Cole on Sunday, 16 December 2018 17:13

One of the trends I find particularly disconcerting is the move towards prophylactic procedures that involve the long-term administration of drugs and constant supervision. Western medicine never takes into account that the body does have its own defences and will seek to heal itself given a sympathetic lifestyle. Whether, as the hypothesis goes, these measures do prevent illness and save the Health Service money, one thing is sure, it keeps us in hock BigPharma now.

Acupuncture has a similar pattern of belief to reflexology and can produce similar sensations and remarkable results.

One of the trends I find particularly disconcerting is the move towards prophylactic procedures that involve the long-term administration of drugs and constant supervision. Western medicine never takes into account that the body does have its own defences and will seek to heal itself given a sympathetic lifestyle. Whether, as the hypothesis goes, these measures do prevent illness and save the Health Service money, one thing is sure, it keeps us in hock BigPharma [i]now[/i]. Acupuncture has a similar pattern of belief to reflexology and can produce similar sensations and remarkable results.
Katherine Gregor on Thursday, 20 December 2018 08:55

I trained in reflexology some twenty years ago. I don't practise, except on my own feet while watching television. Reflexology os wonderful and a useful diagnostic tool (it may not tell you what it is, but gives you a fair indication of where). Personally, though, I find acupuncture a lot more effective. having said that, one thing I believe in strongly, is that all forms of non-conventional medicine should be regulated. There are too many dishonest individuals who misuse them through lack of training or skill, cause damage, and consequently give so-called alternative medicine a bad reputation. I can see, however, how regulating "alternative" medicine may not suit governments. After all, damage or even just lack of any kind of effectiveness produced by "quacks" only helps reinforce the belief that conventional/Western medicine and pharmaceuticals are the only way forward.
A few weeks ago, a Chinese doctor told me that the UK now forbids the use of certain herbs which – if used responsibly – have extraordinarily curative properties but in the hands of these unregulated, untrained individuals can cause severe harm. Because of them, we cannot benefit from these herbs. Now if we had strict regulation, this wouldn't happen quite so often.

I trained in reflexology some twenty years ago. I don't practise, except on my own feet while watching television. Reflexology os wonderful and a useful diagnostic tool (it may not tell you what it is, but gives you a fair indication of where). Personally, though, I find acupuncture a lot more effective. having said that, one thing I believe in strongly, is that all forms of non-conventional medicine should be regulated. There are too many dishonest individuals who misuse them through lack of training or skill, cause damage, and consequently give so-called alternative medicine a bad reputation. I can see, however, how regulating "alternative" medicine may not suit governments. After all, damage or even just lack of any kind of effectiveness produced by "quacks" only helps reinforce the belief that conventional/Western medicine and pharmaceuticals are the only way forward. A few weeks ago, a Chinese doctor told me that the UK now forbids the use of certain herbs which – if used responsibly – have extraordinarily curative properties but in the hands of these unregulated, untrained individuals can cause severe harm. Because of them, we cannot benefit from these herbs. Now if we had strict regulation, this wouldn't happen quite so often.
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Friday, 20 September 2019

Captcha Image

Writing For Life

We are a small, friendly community who value writing as a tool for developing a brighter understanding of the world and humanity. We share our passions and experiences with one another and with a public readership. ‘Guest’ comments are welcome. No login is required. In Social Media we are happy to include interesting articles by other writers on any of the themes below. Enjoy!


Latest Blogs

"What do you mean, it's wrong? In ethics we learned that the truth is always subjective!" There can be no doubt that the teaching of correct wri...
In the South of France. Second time around, the love gets stronger! Thousands of miles away, her mind is able to switch off from reality. Her hear...
  Struggling to break free from a toxic work life,  I've forgotten what a quiet moment sounds like and feels like. Staring at the window and watchi...
The crescent of a new moon is slowly emerging through the darkening sky.  A pale silver at first, now with a bright, almost golden glow.  A waxing n...
  'Flowers appear on the earth;     the season of singing has come, the cooing of doves     is heard in our land.'  &nb...

Latest Comments

Rosy Cole Smitten!
14 September 2019
But who is she? :-)
Katherine Gregor New Moon, New Month
09 September 2019
I'll bear that in mind for next year :–)
Rosy Cole New Moon, New Month
06 September 2019
As every gardener knows, it's always best to plant your beans and flowers on the premier side of the...
Rosy Cole Clarity
06 September 2019
It seems that the 'toxicity' of the workplace is almost universal now. It was never more important t...
Rosy Cole Paris, 14 Juillet
08 August 2019
Yes, I feel confident that 'The Government' does not essentially represent the British people. When ...