Peace

I was sitting outside on my porch today reading for a few hours. All during that time birds came visiting. First there was a beautiful jay, stunning blue and quiet for once, nestled into a spot in the sun just a few feet away. Then a robin. Then a few grosbeaks. Some sparrows. Dad’s favorite wren who lives in the azalea next door. A woodpecker on the nearby tree. Others I couldn’t name. And now there is a doe settled in the shadowed grass about 100 feet away, testing the breeze, with a young buck standing close. Just living. All just living.

Why can’t every place be this peaceful?

Comments 2

 
Rosy Cole on Thursday, 05 July 2018 15:51

The late and much lamented Alan Rickman had this to say, and it does at least sketch an idea of the problem...

'Do you know that moment when you paint a landscape as a child and, when you're maybe under seven or something, the sky is just a blue stripe across the top of the paper? And then there's that somewhat disappointing moment when the teacher tells you that the sky actually comes down in amongst all the branches. And it's as though life changes at that moment and becomes much more complicated and a little bit more boring, as it's rather tedious to fill in the branches.'

We long for the return of innocence and that's increasingly complicated in our riven, driven world, when the objective of peace is sought through external, logical and forceful means. Ironically, for many, it means going to war, and all shades of lesser struggle, when all the time it is a state of being. And one that multitudes must catch simultaneously, and more in the spirit even than the heart.

You are blessed.

The late and much lamented Alan Rickman had this to say, and it does at least sketch an idea of the problem... '[i]Do you know that moment when you paint a landscape as a child and, when you're maybe under seven or something, the sky is just a blue stripe across the top of the paper? And then there's that somewhat disappointing moment when the teacher tells you that the sky actually comes down in amongst all the branches. And it's as though life changes at that moment and becomes much more complicated and a little bit more boring, as it's rather tedious to fill in the branches.'[/i] We long for the return of innocence and that's increasingly complicated in our riven, driven world, when the objective of peace is sought through external, logical and forceful means. Ironically, for many, it means going to war, and all shades of lesser struggle, when all the time it is a state of being. And one that multitudes must catch simultaneously, and more in the spirit even than the heart. You are blessed.
Stephen Evans on Friday, 06 July 2018 18:59

What find so remarkable about the experience is that it occurred on my porch - I didn't have to hike three miles (or twenty) to some spectacular spot of natural wonder - it was just there - and just happening. How much we miss by not being aware.

Since you quoted Alan Rickman, I will quote Ferris Bueller:

"Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it."

What find so remarkable about the experience is that it occurred on my porch - I didn't have to hike three miles (or twenty) to some spectacular spot of natural wonder - it was just there - and just happening. How much we miss by not being aware. Since you quoted Alan Rickman, I will quote Ferris Bueller: "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it."
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