Everyday Superheroes

Huge eyes bulge from their sockets in full Cocker Spaniel spiel, more cute than ugly and loaded in a love that oozes past the film of mucus that has turned those eyes from brown to grey, probably because of the recent marathon surgery and sedation. Little moans come in spasms of mooing coos. This poor girl has been through the trauma of her life, having two vets slice the length of her underside to remove a mammary gland chain. Cancer, whether in pets or humans, is a shit of a thing. Her surgery came at the pinnacle of a most gruelling week.

I sit here now from the summit, listening to my poor little girl’s moans. My son, who had the responsibility of bringing her home from the vet after her surgery, told me not to look at her wound as it would be too upsetting. He knows me well. Her cancer is terminal and although I can say it easily enough, I can't think about it. Not when I see Schnooze splayed to her side, her nose snuggled into her sister. Teddi has moped about these past days, lost without Schnooze. The two have been inseparable for the past eight years, until this point.

I think of her as my little hero for what she’s endured. But that’s not quite the right word. In fact, I don’t like the word hero for it means a person who has performed some courageous act or is of a 'noble character'. Yet everyone performs courageous acts all the time, acts that influence and affect others and contribute to this world. And mostly, quietly and unassumingly, without any fanfare and any need for recognition.

The dictionary also states that a hero is ‘a person who, in the opinion of others, has special achievements, abilities, or personal qualities and is regarded as a role model or ideal.’ This makes me gag! Special achievements. Really? It sounds more like an adoration developed in response to this modern world’s insatiable appetite for the need to be special and recognised, of people to be revered for being exceptional for any celebrity or voyeuristic reason.

Maybe that’s part of the problem with humanity right now, this need to be special when in fact, everyone has their own special abilities and qualities, their own level of achievement and success, however different it is from one person to the other. Maybe that’s why there is so much judgement in the world and so little acceptance and appreciation.

Those that read my words have heard me talk of my brother. While he’s unable to function in the way that mainstream life allows, he does function, and extremely well. His paranoia that can’t be ‘cured’ means he can’t enter a supermarket or walk in his own backyard for fear of people spying on him and his mind is in constant battle with demons that interweave with his schizophrenia. People that don’t him would judge him as the weird guy down the road, the crazy man. Yet he is one of those quiet, gentle giants with an eye to paint and draw that is extraordinary. His oils and charcoals grace the walls of so many and his patience to capture that tender essence of people in his paintings is little understood. Where’s his accolade for his accomplishments, his superb achievements relative to his measure of who he is?

No, the word hero isn’t right. People accomplish everywhere. For Schnooze to endure the surgery and now recovery, however cute she is when she crashes her Elizabethan collar into walls and is unable to reach that urging scratch behind her ear, and the gratitude when you can reach that scratch for her, she’s my little superwoman. And Ms R that I lunched with recently, her patience and determination in sourcing funds for scholarships for young people in disadvantaged areas so they can have a chance to an education and to pursue their dreams, is admirable. Without her and the organisation she works for, these young people would miss their opportunity to contribute to the world in the way they aspire to. Another superwoman, quiet and unassuming, yet so full of the will to give.

It’s times like this past week that I get to sit on the summit after the gruelling climb of the past seven days, to observe and reflect ... on the 70-year-old woman who confessed to being molested by a boy when she was young, in the pool she adored swimming in, which she never returned to again. The remorse in the eyes of her sister at hearing that confession as she never knew of her torment. She's the one to be revered for her exceptional strength for what she's endured for so long. One could say, she should have spoken up. But we all have our limitations and they all differ. No judgement is required on that, or on the woman who barraged abuse at my son, H, simply for being a by-stander in an act of rage on the road. I’m sure she accomplishes in her own world. And one day, ‘bogan’ H, in long hair pulled back to conduct chemistry experiments, will have developed the next drug to cure her ailment in old age. A superman, even with only the aspiration to find the next drug.

We all succeed and triumph relative to our own lives. Take the depth of love that’s hidden from the world because of society’s taboo in loving two people, and the strength of those people to carry that love into their eighties. The giving spirit of the mentor to constantly push the student, to question and dig for answers, even when the question has never been asked before and is so abstract that understanding it seems impossible, let alone answering it.

Look into the eyes of one so young when tragedy strikes and the empathy that bleeds in all shades of the rainbow, or of people young and old who risk their lives to rescue others … they’re everywhere.

Try to understand the strength of the paramedic who becomes de-sensitised to so much yet can still flash a smile of warmth and share a few words of care that can soothe any ache of heart, or the tears that build in the young man with responsibility to collect his very frail dog from the vet … they’ve all accomplished, all have pushed themselves or been pushed to limits that have often been untested.

To be surrounded by people who accomplish so much, without the public and materialistic adoration that goes with the heroism of today’s material world, is a true privilege. The quiet heroes of this world are everywhere. They’re the true superheroes.

***

An unexpected call from the vet last night has revealed that they managed to capture all of Schnooze's cancer, and just in time. Now that's a trio of superwomen I wouldn't want to mess with!

Comments 6

 
Anonymous on Saturday, 13 May 2017 15:33

Yes, there are many ordinary struggling humans all around us doing extraordinary kind and helpful things Thank you for recognizing and celebrating them. .

Yes, there are many ordinary struggling humans all around us doing extraordinary kind and helpful things Thank you for recognizing and celebrating them. .
Monika Schott PhD on Sunday, 14 May 2017 01:49

Thanks, Sue. I think you're one of those extraordinary humans too. :)

Thanks, Sue. I think you're one of those extraordinary humans too. :)
Rosy Cole on Tuesday, 16 May 2017 16:11

Moni, this is a wonderful, heartfelt, life-affirming post and what the world needs to know right now. Losing the life God has given us because we've been led to imagine things ought to be different is an endemic disease. There's no mileage in the illusion that life is better for everyone else. We all have hurdles and hardships to overcome, inside and outside, but gratitude actually does have the power to change the results. Treasuring the moments makes us strong and adds up to a journey well-made. We do owe the universe a living, since, in granting us life, it clearly needs the uniqueness of each and every one of us. Like you, I dislike the word 'hero' and deplored the cult of authors as readers' heroes at RR. It demeans both.

I do hope your furry patient is making a swift recovery and the pain and anguish has lessened.

God bless
x

Moni, this is a wonderful, heartfelt, life-affirming post and what the world needs to know right now. Losing the life God has given us because we've been led to imagine things ought to be different is an endemic disease. There's no mileage in the illusion that life is better for everyone else. We all have hurdles and hardships to overcome, inside and outside, but gratitude actually does have the power to change the results. Treasuring the moments makes us strong and adds up to a journey well-made. We [i]do[/i] owe the universe a living, since, in granting us life, it clearly needs the uniqueness of each and every one of us. Like you, I dislike the word 'hero' and deplored the cult of authors as readers' heroes at RR. It demeans both. I do hope your furry patient is making a swift recovery and the pain and anguish has lessened. God bless x
Monika Schott PhD on Thursday, 18 May 2017 22:42

Sometimes I write these things and wonder if anyone else think the same. Deep down, I think I know they do.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts too, Rosy. x

Sometimes I write these things and wonder if anyone else think the same. Deep down, I think I know they do. Thanks for sharing your thoughts too, Rosy. x
Anonymous on Sunday, 21 May 2017 21:03

I do. Wonderful reflection on life. Thanks for sharing it with us,

I do. Wonderful reflection on life. Thanks for sharing it with us,
Monika Schott PhD on Sunday, 21 May 2017 22:58

Thanks, Nico. Glad you relate to it and enjoyed it.

Thanks, Nico. Glad you relate to it and enjoyed it.
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